CD duplication

The best solution for smaller projects

CD duplication is the best solution if you are just starting a new project and need a reduced volume of CD’s for your business or private project. It applies the process of burning your content directly onto pre-existing CD-R media. CD Duplication saves you time and money on short-turn lower volume CD manufacturing (compared to CD replication).

CD Duplication

CD burning

CD duplication, using a burning process of CD-R ‘s is ideal for quantities smaller than 300 units. The content of your master disc is ‘burned’ onto high quality CD-R ‘s using standard optical disc writers of up to 24 speed. Technical details is available at "about how compact discs work". If you need volumes larger than 300, please visit our CD replication pages.

disc burning

Advantages

  • Fast production!
    CD Duplication needs virtually no set up time. Glass masters and stampers are not needed so we can begin your project immediately. This process is perfect for quantities under 300 or for any quantity if fast turn around time is crucial. Projects are often turned around in 2 to 5 days.
  • Flexibility:
    You can order as few or as many as you need – the same with your paper inserts.
  • Initial set up fees are either non-existent or very minimal compared to pressing.

disc burning

Disadvantages

  • Cost is more per unit than pressed discs, although when you compare the total project cost this is often the way to go! As long as the volumes remain limited.
  • Procedure

    Depending upon your technical level and resources available, several approaches are possible:

    • you provide the complete deliverables : master disc, print files for the artwork on the cover, booklet and bottomcard. These should match our technical specifications which are applied to our free templates.
    • you provide the master disc, but don’t know how to handle the print files. In that case you can rely upon our graphics specialists who will do the job for you.
    • we support you in building your master disc and the print files. For more details visit our Development page.

    PDF screen proof

    Upon receipt of your print files, we’ll send you a PDF proof for approval.
    Once approved, we proceed with the copying of the discs and the printing of your files.
    Next step is mounting the discs, print material and housing, followed by the packaging and the shipment of the final product to your address.

    Production timing

    Turnaround times can vary between 2 to 8 days, mainly depending upon the level of completeness of your deliverables.

    Pricing

    Pricing depends largely upon the quantities you require and the printing/packaging options you choose.

    For details about pricing click here, for special offers click here.

    For a detailed quote, according to your specifications, please use our request for quote– form.


    About CD duplication

    Also called ‘burning’, it is the way to creating compact discs individually rather than ‘stamping ‘ them.
    A regular compact disc is removed from the production line before any data is put on it. We then burn the content onto them with state-of-the-art disc-burners. Your discs are then ready to be printed, packaged and delivered quickly.

    CD Replication


    Superior quality

    CD Replication is the most efficient process for reproducing larger volumes.
    The fully automated high-speed ability of the machinery combined with the integrated computer Quality Control systems assures high-volume CD-ROM manufacturing with perfect quality.

    For medium sized orders to the largest volume production, there is no better alternative than CD Replication.

    CD Replication

    CD pressing

    CD Replication uses a ‘CD pressing’ process, for quantities from 300 to 10.000 ‘s of units. The content of your master CD is transferred to a ‘glassmaster’ which in turn is used for ‘pressing’ your data into pre-molded CD discs. This process is completely robotized and allows more economic production than the ‘burning’ process
    More technical details about How a CD works.

    Optical discs

    The result of this process are high quality, good looking CD-ROM ‘s.

    Procedure

    Depending upon your technical level and resources, several approaches are possible:

    • you provide the complete deliverables : master-CD, print files for CD cover, booklet and bottomcard. These should match our technical specifications which have been applied to our free templates.
    • you provide the master CD, but don’t know how to handle the print files. In that case you can rely on our graphical service specialists who will do the job for you.

      Upon receipt of your print files, we’ll send you a PDF example for approval. Once approved, we will proceed with copying the discs and printing your files.
      Next step is mounting the CD ‘s, print material and housing, followed by packaging and shipment.

    Advantages

    • Very cost effective for larger quantities (300 units and up).
      Most cost effective in quantities of 1000+

    Disadvantages

    • Because of the amount of time to set up each job this method usually takes 8 to 10 working days.
    • There are initial set up fees for film and artwork for each project. These are one time fees but if you make any changes for your next run these would again apply.

    Printing and packaging

    You can find more details about how to prepare your printing materials by reading the documents in our print area.
    For details about the packaging of your discs please visit our packaging page.

    Pressed discs packaging

    Pricing

    Pricing depends upon the quantity and the printing/packaging options you choose.

    More details about special offers and pricing.

    For a detailed quote, please use our CD replication RFQ.

    Production timing

    Turnaround times can vary between 8 to 10 days, depending upon the level of completeness of your deliverables.
    For the printing of your artwork, you can either provide your files yourself or rely on our experience and creativity.

    Applications

    Some examples of optical-disc based applications:

    • Promotion materials
    • Presentations for shows, exhibitions etc.
    • Offline demo of your website
    • Training
    • Gadgets
    • Digital product catalogues
    • Multimedia games
    • Mass storage for distribution
    • Marketing actions
    • Photo albums
    • Software distribution
    • Audio and video distribution

    Final product

    MJK Disc Productions outsources the development of optical disc applications to specialists in this field.

    About CDR Replication

    (Also called “pressing”)
    Replication is the ideal process for reproducing mass quantities of CD ‘s or DVD ’s.
    Because of the high level of automation, the cost per unit becomes very affordable for productions of 500 units upwards. Please fill in our RFQ-form. and we ’ll send you by return our competitive offer.

    CD Production


    e-nable your business

    Do you want to inspire your customers? Attract their attention? Use a CD or DVD for promotional gifts, SLO-article, greater returns from mailings, sweepstakes, exhibition invitation, extras in a product catalog, firm portrait etc, etc..

    Please explore the wealth of information about our CD-Productions we have made available here online. You will find exactly what you need to know in order to take your CD or DVD project from concept to reality. Please fill in our RFQ forms for a personal quote or send us an e-mail at
    info@mjk.be
    .

    Thank you in advance for exploring our website and we look forward to earning your business.

    CD production

    Duplication and Replication

    We use CD Duplication and CD Replication for the production of CD ‘s.
    Constantly increasing and technological improvements, like the increase of CD writing and reading speed, are constantly introducing new applications.

    compact discs

    On this site you’ll find all aspects regarding the production of compact discs and DVD ’s:

    Duplication

    Using CD-R discs: for small quantities (below 300), applying a ‘burning’ process.

    Replication

    Using CD-ROM discs: for medium to large quantities, applying a ‘pressing’ procedure.

    MJK Disc Productions has years of experience duplicating and copying optical discs and can either execute your orders strictly according to your specifications or advise you in all aspects of disc reproduction.

    Pricing

    Pricing depends largely upon the quantities you require and the printing/packaging options you choose.

    For a detailed quote, according to your specifications, please use our request for quote-form.

    Development

    The applications for which a optical discs can be used are extensive and unlimited:

    • Digital product catalogues
    • Multimedia games
    • Mass storage for distribution
    • Digital brochures
    • Education
    • Annual reports
    • Marketing actions
    • Photo albums
    • Software distribution
    • Audio and video
    • WebCD

    MJK Disc Productions outsources the development of optical disc applications to specialists in this field.

    Production timing

    Turnaround times can vary between 5 to 10 days, mainly depending upon the level of completeness of your deliverables.

    Artwork printing

    For the printing of your artwork, you can either provide your files yourself or use our experience and artistic power for generating them.

    WebCD

    In order to update your disc content continuously, a link with your website can be established.

    Did you know…

    That we’re happy to help with special designs, colours, or finishes on your custom packaging? And it doesn’t cost much with us to do your own special package. Please contact us by phone or fill in our contact form. We ‘ll find together the best packaging solution for your project.

    You will find a wide range of information on this site regarding optical disc technologies and we will be glad to send you a very competitive quote, matching your requirements.

    Links

    Recommended resources

    CD technology

    DVD technology

    • DVD Demystified: Extensive FAQ list
    • DVD forum: International association of hardware manufacturers, software firms, content providers and other users of DVD’s (Digital Versatile Discs).

    DTP (Desktop Publishing)


    CD and DVD production

    MJK Disc Productions has been specialized in CD duplication and replication for more than 10 years now.
    DVD ‘s have recently completed our offer. We provide top quality CD and DVD duplication or replication, depending upon your volumes.

    Glass mastering and pressing


    Superior quality

    At MJK Disc Productions we believe that you want to focus on what is important to the success of your business developments and marketing. We will work with you at every step of the way to make a superior product that you can be proud of.

    Glass mastering and pressing

    Glass mastering is the most crucial and complicated part of CD and DVD Replication, requiring technology and skill. Glass mastering is performed free of charge for standard CD/DVD replication above 3000 units.

    Once a customer sends us a final ‘pre-mastered’ disc (generally a CD-R or DVD-R Duplication master disc) we begin the glass mastering process.

    Please note that our customers, including audio CD Mastering facilities (eq, compression, digital assembly services) do not send us glass masters. MJK DP will have the glass master made for you!

    CD Glass Mastering comprises a number of stages needed to create a metallized glass master from which the stampers are produced. The processes are carried out in a Class 1000 clean room. Operators wear special clothing including face masks and footwear to minimize any particles.

    All CD-ROMs require glass mastering. It is a critical step in making CDs. CD-R Replication does not use this process. CD-R uses a stand alone hardware burner which etches laser light into a light-sensitive chemical substrate.

    Customer provides the "Input Media"

    Procedure

    Glass Master preparation of the 20 cm (8 inch) diameter 6mm thick glass master starts by stripping the old photo-resist from its surface (since the glass blanks can be recycled). This is followed by cleaning and final washing using de-ionized water. The blank master is then dried carefully and ready for the next stage. The surface of the clean glass master is then coated with a photo-resist layer 150 microns thick by spin coating. The uniformity of the layer is measured with an infra red laser. The photo-resist coated glass master is then baked at about 80 degrees Celcius for 30 minutes. This hardens the photo-resist layer ready for exposing by laser light.

    Laser Beam Recording is where the photo-resist layer is exposed with laser light in a Class 1000 clean room-controlled environment using a blue gas laser directly from the source audio or CD-ROM data.

    The photo-resist is exposed where pits are to be pressed in the final disc. The photo-resist surface is then developed to remove the photo-resist exposed by the laser and therefore create pits in the surface. These pits should extend right through the photo-resist to the glass underneath to achieve good pit geometries as specified in the Red Book. The glass itself is unaffected by this process.

    The active surface (called the "father" – containing pits) of the developed glass master is then metallized either with silver by evaporation or a nickel or nickel alloy created by sputtering. The glass master is then played on a Disc Master Player (DMP) to check for any errors. Audio masters are actually listened to at this stage.

    The final stage is then making the reverse image stamper or "mother". The mother is then form-pressed onto the extruded "children" membranes using high speed hydraulic presses. This membrane will ultimately contain all the binary information used to play the disc.

    The finished compact disc that the customer receives is a combination of the child’s membrane layer, an aluminum layer which reflects the laser light back up into the player, and a polycarbonate (plastic extrusion) outer shell. The final disc must be perfectly uniform and well balanced if the disc is to perform flawlessly. CD-ROM data players can now spin at extremely fast speeds. If your disc is not manufactured under ISO9002 procedures then flaws (and headaches) may result.


    CD and DVD production

    MJK Disc Productions has been specialized in CD duplication and replication for more than 10 years now.
    DVD ‘s have recently completed our offer. We provide top quality CD and DVD duplication or replication, depending upon your volumes.

    DVD explained


    Superior quality

    At MJK Disc Productions we believe that you want to focus on what is important to the success of your business developments and marketing. We will work with you at every step of the way to make a superior product that you can be proud of.

    How does a DVD work?

    Extremely Dense with Much Capacity

    DVD, popularly know as the Digital Versatile Disc (it really means Digital Versatile Disc), is the next generation of optical disc media.Though a DVD looks like a CD, inside it holds between 7 and 25 times the data. That means a new level of quality and convenience for movies, music, multimedia and interactive software. Never before has one new technology changed so many aspects of home entertainment.

    Minimum Seven Times the Data of a CD

    DVD achieves its huge capacity by packing more data into the same physical space as a CD. It does this in several ways. First, it’s tracks are closer together and the pits in each track are smaller. Second, new data compression technology is highly efficient, minimizing the need to store repetitive of unneeded data. Third, two separate layers of tracks can be combined into a single DVD disc. For movies, this adds up to a minimum of 2 hours and 13 minutes of video play. A dual-layer disc provides 4-hour play, and doesn’t need to be turned over. A single layered double-sided disc provides about 4 hours and 30 minutes.Longer playing times are only the most obvious advantage. DVD’s huge capacity also supports ultra-realistic picture quality and hi-fi sound not to mention interactive multimedia enhancements.



    DVD 5 (4,7 GB)
    One coat, one-side scanning

    DVD 9 (8,5 GB)
    Double coat, one-side scanning

    DVD 10 (9,5 GB)
    One coat, two-side scanning

    DVD 17 (17 GB)
    Double coat, two-side scanning


    All the Advantages of an Optical Disc

    Like a compact disc or laserdisc, DVD permits random access to any point on the disc. There’s no need to shuttle forward or backward through a tape, and of course there’s no rewinding. As an optical disc, DVD never physically contacts the pickup. The disc is played by a beam of laser light, so there is no wear and tear even if you keep replaying the same scene. The tough plastic surface is forgiving of fingerprints, dust and dirt. Care is the same as for compact discs – no special treatment needed. This means that you can play your DVD collection thousands of times and continue to enjoy the same beautiful picture and sound quality.

    How is it Different from CD ‘s?

    On the outside, a DVD is virtually indistinguishable form a CD. It has the same 5" diameter and 1.2mm thickness. Like a CD, it’s easy to carry, safe to handle, and is just the right space-saving compact size for home entertainment. The only difference is the format and the amount of information.

    Smaller Pits, Narrower Track Pitch Inside



    Compact Disc           


    DVD disc        


    On the inside, a DVD is totally different. Its pits are half the size of CD pits (0.4µm vs. 0.83µm), and it’s tracks are spaced about twice as closer together (0.74µm vs. 1.6µm). See following image…

    Thin-Substrate Bonded Disc

    In a CD player, the laser bean has to pass through a relatively thick layer of plastic to reach the data pits. To help a DVD player focus on its smaller pits, a DVD disc uses a thinner plastic substrate. By itself, such a thin disc would not stay flat or withstand handling. Therefore, every DVD is joined to a second 0.6mm substrate, using bonding technology developed by Panasonic. On a single-layer disc, one of the two substrates has no recorded data.


    CD and DVD markets

    Over the last 10 years CD ‘s, and more recently DVD ‘s, have become the most widely used media for storing, publishing and distribution of large amounts of data. The variety in packaging and presentation have made CD ‘s the favorite tool for mass marketing actions both in the data and music worlds. At MJK Disk Productions, we are specialized in the reproduction of CD ‘s and DVD ’s in any quantity.

    Compact Discs explained


    Superior quality

    At MJK Disc Productions we believe that you want to focus on what is important to the success of your business developments and marketing. We will work with you at every step of the way to make a superior product that you can be proud of.

    How does a CD work?

    Laser beam

    Like gramophone records, the information on optical discs is recorded on a spiral track. However, with a CD the laser starts reading the disc from the inside ring (table of contents) and ends up on the outside. When play back starts, a laser beam shines on the ridges and lands on the data membrane layer. If you look at the image on the right you can see the data layer moving in gray.

    During playback, the number of revolutions of the disc decreases from 500 to 200 rpm (revolutions per minute) to maintain a constant scanning speed. The disc data is converted into electrical pulses (the bit stream) by reflections of the laser beam from a photoelectric cell.



    When the laser beam strikes "land", the beam is reflected onto a photoelectric cell. When it strikes a "ridge", the photocell will receive only a weak reflection. Thus the photoelectrical cell receives series of light pulses corresponding to the ridges and lands in the disc. These light pulses are the foundation of binary ‘digital’ data. A simple substitution for the weak signal "0" and the in-focus signal "1" results in a pure digital playback without alteration, every time, without failure or degradation.
    In music playback, a D/A-Converter (digital to analogue converter; DAC) converts the series of pulses (binary coding) from a decimal code to a waveform, which can then be processed for amplification. The longer the decimal code, the better the sound. Current standard CD audio is 44,100 pulses per second and 16 bit (decimal places) in digital word length. Thus a 24 bit system sounds all that much better, in fact DVD audio is set to allow 24 bit AND pulse at 97,000 times per second!

    The Compact Disc player mechanism

    The laser pickup reads the disc from below.
    Thanks to this optical scanning system, there is no friction between the laser beam and the disc. As a result, the discs do not wear, no matter how often they are played. However, they must be treated carefully, as scratches, grease stains and dust might intercept or diffract the light, causing whole series of pulses to be skipped or distorted. This problem can be solved, as during the recording the Cross Interleaved Reed Solomon Code (CIRC) is added, which is an error correction system that automatically inserts any lost or damaged information by making a number of mathematical calculations. Without this error correction system optical disc players would not have existed, as even the slightest vibration of the floor would cause sound and image distortions.

    When the laser beam hits land, all of its light is reflected and the cell gives off current. When the laser beam shines on a ridge, half of the light hits the upper surface and the other half hits the lower down service. The difference in height between the two places is exactly a quarter of a wavelength of the laser beam light, so the original beam is totally eliminated by the interference between the beam reflected from the surface of the disc and the beam reflected from the ridge. The photocell does not produce current.
    It should be noted that the ends of the ridges seen by the laser are "ones" and all lands and ridges are "zeros"; thus turning on and off the reflection is one, steady state is a string of zeroes. As it is not possible to have two ones next to each other, Eight to Fourteen Modulation (EFM) is used to convert 8-bit data bytes to 14 bit units that always have a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 10 zeros between ones. This makes the pits/ridges and lands separating them 3 to 11 bits long, no less, no more. This conversion is done in hardware using a ROM lookup table. To connect these 14 bit units 3 merge bits are used to make sure that there are no "ones" too close to each other. In audio, the third merge bit is used to make sure that the cumulative lengths of the lands and ridges stay equal in the long run, otherwise a low frequency component is created that the processing amplifiers can not handle. Thus 8 data bits are actually 17 channel bits on the disc, but called 16 bit for naming conventions.

    The scanning must be very accurate because the track of ridges is 30 times narrower than a single human hair. You can see the "ridge" in the illustration above -it is the DARK ROUND CIRCLE. When the laser light is over top of it, the light ‘splits’ in two, causing a weak signal. There are 20,000 tracks on one audio compact disc. The lens which focuses the laser beam on the disc has a depth of field of about 1 micron (micron = micrometer = one-millionth of a meter).
    It is quite normal for the (compact) disc to move back and forth 1mm during playback. A flexible regulator keeps the lens at a distance of +/- 2 micron from the rotating disc. For the same reason, a perfect tracking system is required. The complex task of following the track is controlled by an electronic servo system. The servo system ensures the track is followed accurately by measuring the signal output. If the output decreases, the system recognizes this as being "off track" and returns the tracking system to its optimum state.
    Many CD players use three-beam scanning for correct tracking. The three beams come from one laser. A polarized prism projects three spots of light on the track. It shines the middle one exactly on the track, and the two other "control" beams generate a signal to correct the laser beam immediately, should it deflect from the middle track.

    The disc

    The CD is a plastic disc 1.2mm thick and 12cm in diameter, with a silver-colored surface that reflects laser light. The maximum playing time for music recorded on compact disc is 74 minutes. The CD has several layers. First, to protect the 8 trillion microscopically small pits against dirt and damage, the CD has a plastic protective layer. On the top of this layer the label is printed. Then there is the reflecting aluminum coating, which contains the ridges. Finally, the disc has a transparent carrier through which the actual reading of the disc takes place. This plastic forms a part of the optical system. Mechanically, the CD is less vulnerable than the analogue record, but that does not mean that it must not be treated with care.

    The protective layer on the label side is very thin: only 0.002mm. Careless treatment or granular dust can cause small scratches or hair cracks, enabling the air to penetrate the evaporated aluminum coating. This coating then starts oxidizing immediately at that spot. If the CD is played extensively, it may be advisable to protect the label side with a special protective foil, which is commonly available in shops.
    A CD must never be bent, so care should be taken when removing it from the jewel case. Even slight bending causes stress fractures. The aluminum then becomes deformed, causing some ridges to be blocked. As a consequence, error correction always has to be applied in that area, affecting the final sound.
    The reflecting side of the CD is the side that is read. People tend to set the CD down with the reflecting side up. But the more vulnerable side is not the reflecting side but the label side. On the label side, the reflecting layer with its ridges has been evaporated. The sensitive layer on the reflecting side has been protected better than the one on the label side. It is therefore better to store CDs with the reflecting side down. It is best to store the CD back in the jewel case, where it is safely held by its inside edge.
    Never write on the label side, even with a felt-tipped pen. The ink may penetrate the thin protective coating and affect the aluminum layer.

    Scratches

    CDs are easily scratched, and should never be cleaned with just any cloth. CDs should be cleaned radially: not along the grooves, but at right angles to the direction of the grooves. If a smear, however small, should remain on the CD, running along the direction of the grooves, much information would be lost. It is advisable to use special CD cleaner that operates with a rotating brush at right angles to the direction of the grooves.
    Many people think that the digital CD is produced completely digitally, but this is not always the case. Many CDs have an analogue master tape as their source tapes still kept in the library of the record company, used in the past to make records. The quality of a CD made from analogue tape can be surprisingly high. A CD recorded, processed and dubbed digitally does not always sound better than a CD produced with one or two analogue processing stages.
    To indicate what stages have been treated in what ways, a useful three-letter code is used on recordings. The letters represent: the recording, the editing/mixing process, and dubbing, respectively. They are printed on the CD and/or on the insert label in a rectangular box. There are three possibilities: DDD (completely digital CD); ADD (analogue recording, digital processing and dubbing); and AAD (analogue recording and processing, digital dubbing). Many CDs carry the ADD or AAD indication. This does not mean that they are inferior to the DDD CDs!


    Superior quality

    At MJK Disc Productions we believe that you want to focus on what is important to the success of your business developments and marketing. We will work with you at every step of the way to make a superior product that you can be proud of.

    Request For Quote

    Duplication or Replication?

    On this page you can find out what reproduction solution is best for your project.
    Links are provided to guide you to the duplication and replication request forms.

    Please fill in our RFQ forms for a personal quote or send us an e-mail at info@copyking.be.

    Request for quote

    There are two ways for you to reproduce your CD/DVD project: duplication and replication.
    We’ll give a short description of both and then a couple of guidelines to help you determine which is best for your particular project.

    Which process is best for me?

    The two processes will produce virtually identical product. The decision usually now revolves around quantity and timing.
    A few suggestions:

    • If you need your project in under two weeks choose duplication
    • If you need less than 300 discs choose duplication (burning)
    • If you need 300 discs or more choose replication (pressing)

    Overview of request forms

     Quantity < 300Quantity > 300
    CD project CD DuplicationCD Replication
    DVD projectDVD DuplicationDVD Replication
    Shaped CD projectBusiness Card CD / Shaped CD / Mini-CD / Mini-DVD

    Superior quality

    At MJK Disc Productions we believe that you want to focus on what is important to the success of your business developments and marketing.
    We will work with you at every step of the way to make a superior product that you can be proud of.

    Please fill in our RFQ forms for a personal quote or send us an e-mail at info@mjk.be.