All posts in Desktop Publishing

DVD print specifications

Graphics and printing

MJK Disc wants to help you in understanding and managing the reproduction, printing and packaging of your DVD releases. We are dedicated to providing you state of the art solutions and top quality services.

Please consult our print area to take advantage of the information and tips that we want to share with you on this site.

Print specifications

DVD Duplication projects

For short-runs or volumes up to 300 units, we’ll use the following printing methods:

– digital printing (labels on top of the DVD)
– thermo-transfer full colour printing (printed directly on the DVD)

DVD Replication projects

For volumes starting from 351 units, we’ll use the following printing methods:

silkscreen (PMS / Spot Colors)
offset printing (CMYK)

Use our templates

Please do use our templates available for free in our print area in order to use the correct measurements for your printing material.

Print area

To offer you help with preparing the digital artwork for your printing material, we have provided layout guides and other useful DTP-related documents in our print area.
Please do read these documents carefully should you decide to prepare the artwork for print yourself.
We do recommend however to let us handle the printing material in case you have little or no experience with desktop applications and image manipulation.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us should you have any remaining questions after having read through our documents or to request a quote for your DVD-production.


Quality artwork

MJK Disc Productions offers quality short-run CD and DVD duplicating services, including full graphical support and services at cost-effective pricing. All this in accordance with our high quality standards.

Working with fonts


Shortcut links

Font problems
Type 1 MAC
TrueType MAC
Type 1 & TrueType WIN
Font families & styles
Avoiding font problems

Working with fonts

Font problems

Extremely important elements in processing a job are the fonts used in the page layout document. Fonts are actually mini files that manage the “typefaces” you see on the monitor.
In order to output your files correctly, we need to have the same manufacturer, and version number of the fonts on our system that were used in your document.

Font problems are unquestionably responsible for more job delays and frustrations than any other area of digital file production. However, they can be easily avoided once you know what to look for and how to properly organize your fonts.

Type 1 fonts for Macintosh

The original Adobe Postscript font format, Type 1, is still considered to be the best by most professionals. Type 1 fonts consist of two parts: the SCREEN font and the PRINTER font.
The screen font is a bitmap image of the letter forms used to represent the type on screen.

Shown above is a sample of the icon used for a Type 1 (or postscript) screen font for Helvetica Bold.
Screen fonts are usually collected in a “suitcase”, which can contain fonts from many different families. For proper organization of your fonts, it is best to put each font family in its own font suitcase.

Shown above is a sample of the screen font suitcase for the Helvetica family.

The printer font contains the data that is actually sent to the laser printer or imagesetter and it is used to correctly render each character. If the printer fonts are not available or are damaged, your font will look “jaggy” on the screen and will either print with the same bitmapped appearance, or convert automatically to a default system font such as Courier.

A sample of the printer font icon for Helvetica is shown above.
It is important to send both the screen and printer components for each font used in your document. This includes fonts used for EPS files (3rd party EPS files are notorious for containing fonts not included with the job, as they are often sent to clients without including the font files). Many fonts with the same name, such as Helvetica, are manufactured by more than one company and may have differences in kerning values, letter weight, etc., which may cause your text copy to reflow if we have to substitute our version of the font because we did not have yours. On a Macintosh platform, the fonts can be found in your main hard drive system’s folder:

Unless you are using a type manager
your MAC fonts are in the system folder.

TrueType Fonts for Macintosh

The TrueType format was developed by Microsoft and is now widely distributed with system software, applications and on disks of font collections. The most obvious difference between Type 1 and TrueType is that in True Type both screen and printer data are contained in one file whereas Type 1 has two separate files.

A sample of the TrueType icon for the italic version of Century Gothic for a Macintosh is shown above. TrueType fonts are also stored in a font suitcase and should never be mixed with Type 1 screen fonts. Rename the suitcase to Century Gothic Type1 and Century Gothic Truetype and place the files accordingly. If you have both types of fonts in the same suitcase it will occasionally cause problems when printing.

Type 1 and True Type for Windows

The same concepts apply for Windows versions of Type 1 (postscript) and True Type fonts. Just as on a Macintosh system, the postscript font is composed of two parts, a printer font and a screen font. The printer font has an extension of .pfb and the screen font has an extension of .pfm, and both have the same red Adobe “A” icon as shown below.

Printer fonts are used by ATM (Adobe Type Manager) to create crisp, accurate screen renditions of the font at any point size. You will find the postscript fonts in C:\psfonts folder. You must be sure to send both the screen and printer components.

A sample of a Windows True Type icon is shown above. If you are using ATM, then these fonts can be found in your C:\windows\fonts\ATM folder.

If you do not use ATM, then all fonts available on your system should be found in C:\windows\fonts.

Font families & styles

One benefit of using ATM (Adobe Type Manager) is that it can help you find your fonts quickly on your hard drive. The Deluxe version includes a Font List tab which allows you to see all the fonts your system uses as well as if they are True Type or postscript ( Type 1) fonts. You can locate a font on this list by clicking on it, and then under “Display” go to “Properties” (shown below) and it will tell you exactly where this font is, as well as the actual name of the font. This can be very useful since many fonts such as the “Times” font family can have the following names: “TIR”-Times Roman; “TIB”-Times Bold; “TII”-Times Italic; “TIBI”-Times Bold Italic.

A font is an individual style and weight, for example, Times Bold. A family is a collection of these individual fonts. The family will include Times, Times Bold, Times Italic, Times Bold Italic, etc. Your font package will contain a printer font and a screen font for each member of this family. A mistake commonly made when setting up files is to “style” the font instead of selecting the true font. One example would be to use Times, then apply bold to it by choosing the “bold” option from the font style menu. If you initially set up your pages by applying styles, always go back through your document using the “find and replace” function and change these stylized fonts to the correct family member to avoid imaging problems.

When you apply the characteristic <italic> to the font "Times," the program goes to the font file for "Times" and asks it, "what is the name of your italic companion typeface?" The font replies "Times Italic," and the page layout program searches for a font with that name. If the page layout program finds "Times Italic," then that’s what it uses. But if "Times Italic" is missing, that spells trouble.

You should never apply bold or italic stylization to fonts that do not have existing bold or italic family members. It may work on your screen, and may even print to a printer, but generally will not work correctly when sent to an imagesetter. Sometimes bold applied to a font that does not have a bold family member will cause the font to have a double image. Applying italics this way may cause the font to only slant instead of becoming a true italic, or may not print at all to an imagesetter.

Some styles, such as underline, superior, superscript, subscript and small caps, can only be accomplished by using the styles menu and are generally acceptable. The drop shadow and outline styles should be avoided –they were designed for non-postscript use.

More information regarding fonts and styles can be reviewed at Adobe’s font tutorial section:
www.adobe.com/type

Avoiding font problems

  • Please use Adobe Type 1 fonts (when working on MAC) for obtaining the best results.
  • Please include all fonts that have been used. Even so-called ‘standard’ fonts, because different versions of the same font do exist and may cause unwanted differences in the printing of your documents.
  • Do not stylize fonts (make Bold and italic) in Quark; i.e. don’t use the ‘bold’ command to make regular Helvetica appear bold. Use the correct Helvetica Bold font instead. All fonts need to be shipped with your print files, including the bold or italic font versions.
  • Remember the fonts embedded in EPS files. Often a customer will send the fonts used to create headlines and text, but forget to include fonts that are contained in EPS graphics that are imported into the page layout document.
  • As an alternative, before creating an EPS, you can convert the text to paths. Most Illustration programs, especially Illustrator and FreeHand, have the ability to change text into vector elements so you no longer need to include the font files. It becomes self contained. Do backup your files before you convert!
    (select your text > Type > Create Outlines)
  • Avoid nesting or layering of fonts. Placing type in a graphic, then placing it in another graphic, and finally, imprinting it into the page layout program could make it hard for the imagesetter to find the font. Try to keep graphic file construction simple.
  • Avoid obscure font manufacturers or bargain basement fonts. All fonts are not created equal. Strange fonts could cause problems with high-resolution output. Some of these types of fonts are only made for 300 DPI laser printers.
  • Minimum text size: Serif 4 pt, Sans-Serif 3 pt

Font problems

Extremely important elements in processing a job are the fonts used in the page layout document.

Font problems are unquestionably responsible for more job delays and frustrations than any other area of digital file production. However, they can be easily avoided once you know what to look for and how to properly organize your fonts.

Tutorials

DTP tutorial guide

Use the tutorials listed on this page to learn all about preparing your digital artwork for print.

Additionally, we’ve selected some books on the topic that we recommend you to read should you have no prior experience with desktop publishing.

Tutorials

About.com

By Skill Level
By Software
Prerequisites
Graphic Design
Scanning
Graphics Use
Typography
Prepress/File Prep
Printing/Finishing

Adobe.com

www.adobe.com

Quark.com

www.quark.com


Why not let MJK Disc Productions do everything for you?
Call +32 (0)16 89 37 35, use our online contact form or send an e-mail to info@mjk.be to find out how easy we can make it for you.

Books

How to choose DTP books?

www.about.com

Book list

General

Indesign

Quark


Graphical services

MJK Disc Productions also offers full DTP and graphical services for preparing your artwork for print.

Do not hesitate to make use of these services should you have no experience and equipment to prepare the artwork yourself.

Tips and checklist

Shortcut links

Page layout software
Preferred software
Problems other software
First impressions
We can help you!
Design pitfalls

Tips and Checklist DTP

Page layout software

Page layout programs allow the user to open a template file, import images and text, select from a variety of type fonts and sizes, column justifications, document formatting, and image linking. Page layout programs enable designers to produce professional quality results inexpensively and quickly without the need for outside typesetting or assistance.

To begin working with MJK Disc Productions templates, you must have available one of the three page layout programs listed below:

  • QuarkXpress v4.0 or higher
  • Adobe Indesign v1.0 or higher
  • Adobe Illustrator v8.0 or higher
  • Adobe Pagemaker v6.5 or higher

Which software does MJK Disc Productions prefer?

Adobe Indesign is the best choice for DTP related jobs.
It offers numerous advantages over Quark, among which options that allow for more creativity, saving valuable time and increasing productivity.
Check out www.adobe.com to read some objective third parties reviews of the advantages of Indesign over Quark.

QuarkXpress is the next best program preferred for basic page layouts.
The preflight options and error checking are efficient and well supported. Documents print to postscript much more efficiently than Illustrator or Pagemaker. When you import images they are automatically linked to an external file which is what we want. A low resolution version of your image is produced inside the Quark document making the file much quicker to open and edit. Quark features a great variety of plugins and text handling abilities such as importing formatted Word documents.
More details available at www.quark.com.

Problems with other software

Pagemaker
Avoid using this program for it contains plenty of bugs and disadvantages that will result in loss of valuable time and productivity. Adobe created Indesign for a reason. It’s odd that that Pagemaker is still sold and upgraded, for Indesign will eventually replace Pagemaker.
Still, Pagemaker are accepted if this is the only program available to the client.

CorelDraw
This program is no longer supported after numerous complaints with the quality of the end product. Characters disappear and color shifts occur when converting to PDF. We can’t guarantee the outcome of Corel Draw programs, so we do not support Corel Draw files.

Acrobat PDF
Since you would need to make a PDF file using Indesign,Quark, Illustrator or Pagemaker anyway, we prefer to have the original layouts and not PDF-documents. PDFs have a numerous options using compression that can cause low quality printing. It only supports CMYK color and is ‘locked’ so we can not adjust your files if you inadvertently make a layout error.

Illustrator
Illustrator is an Illustration program and not really set up to handle multi-page booklets and bottomcard layouts. For single sheet output like a CD labels however it is an available option. Features we enjoy with Illustrator are the layers palette which allows us to add masks, non-printing comments and guidelines to assist designers with our templates. Also the ability to work with compound paths makes CD face design a breeze.

One of the most common errors with Illustrator is that inexperienced designers PASTE images onto the art board rather than using the “File > Place”-command, or they check “Include external files within document” option during saving making for a hefty bloated Illustrator file that causes all sorts of delays with the computers while ripping your files.
Please anticipate longer preflight times if you submit anything other than Indesign or Quark files -unless your layout is very simple.

TIP: design in Illustrator and move EPS files to Quark and but don’t forget to include your font files for the EPS!

Photoshop
Photoshop is a raster image editing program, not a page layout program. You can use Photoshop but eventually the file must be placed in Quark or Illustrator for proper output to the plate making machines. Think of PSD files (Photoshop) as snap shots and Quark or Illustrator as the photo album that assembles them all together.
Submitting only Photoshop files will result in additional charges.

Photoshop usually contains bitmap elements (dots on a page) but newer versions can contain vector based elements (mathematical values of geometric shapes) these elements enable super high resolution of the object. Sometimes these elements can get flattened during transport (file size is reduced) which then renders all vector based items (including text!) into lower resolution dots (we usually ask for 300 Disc Productions i images). Once this happens changing paragraphs, text alignment and typos is not possible. If you keep text vector based, as you would by typing your text elements in Quark or Illustrator, your result is smooth, high-resolution text and not halftones creating the “jaggies” PROVIDED you send us the font file (small .ttf files that contain the font shape info).
This program should only be used for what it is intended – to create photo images for placement into Indesign or Quark.

What if you have no access to Quark or Illustrator and are ready to go with only Photoshop files?
MJK Disc Productions can accept Photoshop files for about EUR 100 additional to your original quote. We will mount into our templates and advise you of any adjustments or modifications needed prior to production.

Additional charges for adjustments and layouts over 8 pages.

The very first impression is the artwork.

There are two main methods of getting your design onto the CD face and paper parts:

  • For experienced computer graphics designers
    You are (or know someone who is) an experienced computer graphics designer and can organize Indesign, Quark, Illustrator files using MJK Disc Productions approved templates.
    If no errors found we will then produce pre-press proofs for you to review and approve before your job is run. Please review your Proofing Options for this service and then read all about the technical side at our Computer Graphics info center.

MJK Disc Productions will be pleased to instruct you how to get professional high resolution images, deep colors and crisp text into your packaging. Call our graphics department now to discuss your next project at +32 (0)16 89 37 35.

  • No graphic design experience?
    MJK Disc Productions will help with the design & layout of your artwork.
    Send us your images, Word Doc with text, fonts, and mockup and let MJK Disc Production’s professional graphics team assemble your ideas in record time. Email PDF proofs available to ensure your complete satisfaction.
    MJK Disc Productions will take your pictures and text to create CD labels, booklets, mailers, software boxes…almost anything!

Call +32 (0)16 89 37 35, use our online contact form or send an e-mail to info@mjk.be to find out how easy we can make it for you.

Need help with the preparation of you artwork?

Why not let MJK Disc Productions do everything for you?
Call +32 (0)16 89 37 35, use our online contact form or send an e-mail to info@mjk.be to find out how easy we can make it for you.

Common design pitfalls

Every file submitted for production will include a full preflight (analysis) in an attempt to identify issues or ‘show stoppers’ that will prevent your project from continuing. It is much easier for all involved if you are aware up front that minor adjustments may be made to your files to ensure smooth transfers to the printing plates.It is critical you carefully check for changes made to your designs during proofing stages.

Common mistakes found with client supplied electronic printing material:

General

  • Client did not use our templates
  • Client did not read the tutorial you are reading now
  • Templates were exported as EPS files. Keep all templates in their native file types
  • Images were pasted or dragged into the layout. Always use File | Place or Import
  • Placed images resolution too low or too high (always use 300 DPI)
  • In CMYK mode you colored something 400% density. (Too much ink)
  • Images saved in RGB instead of CMYK
  • Images delivered in wrong file format (JPG, GIF,…). Use TIFF, BMP, PSD.
  • B&W images saved as RGB or CMYK
  • Corrupted or missing Post Script printer fonts
  • Spelling mistakes and typos (e.g. Order of tracks, names of band members)
  • Placing text in a 300 DPI Photoshop image. Publishing programs like Indesign or Quark should be used for text placement.
  • Fonts and other unused items from design experimentation never deleted.

CD Label Specific:

  • Client did not read the customer supplied film specifications guide
  • Label film not sized to specifications
  • Line screen not respected (120 max)
  • Gradients used (very hard to reproduce accurately)
  • Gradient fills for label too detailed (need slow transitions)
  • Image or information inside the non-printable area of the disc label
  • Image outside printable area
  • PMS colors not separating properly. (Do test separations at your end first)
  • Florescent colors specified (don’t use them)
  • Hexachrome values used (do not use a number with a dash: e.g.. PMS156-7)

Paper Parts specific (booklets tray cards etc.)

  • Image files not supplied
  • Tray card spine text upside down
  • Bar code placed on nonwhite background
  • Pantone colors specified in CMYK output (paper parts) without prior warning.
  • No mockup supplied for booklets and CD label
  • Text too close to cut marks. Allow for enough gutter margin)
  • No bleed around booklet panels

Fonts:

  • Fonts are missing or incomplete
  • Do not stylize fonts (make Bold and italic) in Quark; i.e. don’t use the ‘bold’ command to make regular Helvetica appear bold. Use the correct Helvetica Bold font instead. All fonts need to be shipped with your print files, including the bold or italic font versions.
  • Remember the fonts embedded in EPS files. Often a customer will send the fonts used to create headlines and text, but forget to include fonts that are contained in EPS graphics that are imported into the page layout document.
  • As an alternative, before creating an EPS, you can convert the text to paths. Most Illustration programs, especially Illustrator and FreeHand, have the ability to change text into vector elements so you no longer need to include the font files. It becomes self contained. Do backup your files before you convert!
    (select your text > Type > Create Outlines)
  • Avoid nesting or layering of fonts. Placing type in a graphic, then placing it in another graphic, and finally, imprinting it into the page layout program could make it hard for the imagesetter to find the font. Try to keep graphic file construction simple.
  • Avoid obscure font manufacturers or bargain basement fonts. All fonts are not created equal. Strange fonts could cause problems with high-resolution output. Some of these types of fonts are only made for 300 DPI laser printers.

Desktop Publishing

Designing your artwork and laying it out is an important part of CD- and DVD productions.
Take some time to study our tips and use our checklist to avoid problems with your artwork for print.

Templates

Use our free templates

Should you decide to design your artwork yourself and not make use of our graphical services, do make use of our freely available templates to avoid problems.

We highly recommend you to read through at least our guidelines and requirements and print specifications for CD or  print specifications for DVD pages.

Check out all the documents in this print area in case you have no experience preparing artwork for print or make use of our graphical services to save time and to avoid problems.

Templates and specifications for CD, CD-ROM en DVD

Download our free templates and specifications below.
Please verify that you download the correct files! Choose among the ‘DUPLICATION‘ files if you wish us to reproduce less than 300 discs. Choose ‘REPLICATION‘ should you need more than 300 discs copied.

  • Choose "save as" when the download dialog box opens and save the files to a location on your harddisk.
  • You can open the Quark-files from within Adobe Indesign.
  • Contact us by e-mail or call +32 (0)16 89 37 35 if you wish us to assist and support you!

Disc printing and disc labels

DUPLICATION : up to about 300 discs (up to 500 discs for CD-ROM Business Cards)

MEDIUM
Quark / Indesign
Illustrator / Photoshop
Specifications
CD-RQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
DVD-RQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
30 MB Business Card CD Quark & Indesign templateon demandPDF specification document
60 MB Business Card CD Quark & Indesign templateon demandPDF specification document
60 MB Business Card (afgerond) Quark & Indesign templateon demandPDF specification document
200 MB Mini CD ( 8 cm) Quark & Indesign templateon demandPDF specification document

REPLICATION: from 500 discs onwards

MEDIUM
Quark / Indesign
Illustrator / Photoshop
Specifications
Audio CD / CD-ROMQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
CD-RQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
DVD 5 / DVD 9Quark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
30 MB Business Card CD Quark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
100 MB Business Card CD Quark & Indesign templateon demandPDF specification document
190 MB Mini CD-ROM (8cm)Quark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document

Packaging options

PACKAGING
Quark / Indesign
Illustrator / Photoshop
Specifications
page order replicationXXPDF specification document
page order duplicationXXPDF specification document
JewelBox bookletQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
JewelBox bottomcard (inlay) Quark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Plastic Sleeve booklet Quark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Leaflet DVD BoxQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Booklet DVD BoxQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Carton SleeveQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Carton Sleeve 8cm Mini CDQuark & Indesign templateEPS for Illustrator & PhotoshopPDF specification document
Digipak® 2 panels – CD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS format for Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Digipak® 2 panels – DVD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS voor Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Digipak® 3 panels – CD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS format for Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Digipak® 3 panels – DVD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS format for Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Digifile® 2 panels – CD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS format for Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Digifile® 3 panels – CD formaatPDF format for Indesign, Illustrator & PhotoshopEPS format for Illustrator, Photoshop & Indesigncfr template
Other Digi-packagingTemplates for other Digi-packaging models are available on request

These packaging options are available for both CD as DVD productions!

Contact us should you have any other problem using or downloading these files.


Use our DTP-services

If your files are designed and ready to go but you used Photoshop or a 3rd party template, send us your Photoshop or other image files (TIFF, BMP, EPS), font files or whatever else you have, and for an additional charge we can mount into our templates (based on workable formats).
Prices vary from project to project and depend on the amount of layout work is necessary.
Additional charges for any adjustments needed and inserts over 8 pages.

Contact us by using our online contact form or send us an e-mail for more information about our graphical design services. You can also call us at +32 (0)16 89 37 35.

Silkscreen Printing


For over 300 units

MJK Disc Productions prints high quality artwork for CD- and DVD productions of over 300 units using the silk screen process.

Silk Screen printing

You may be familiar with other applications for screen printing (also referred to as silk-screen), such as balloons, pens and textiles.

If we were to send a CD down an offset web press, the rollers would soon turn our fragile CD into a nice collection of plastic bits. A nicer, gentler approach is needed. Enter the silk-screen machine. The CD slides effortlessly along a conveyer system and stops under a yellow sheet of synthetic material (fabric mesh) for each color needed. A squeegee then drags ink across the disc’s surface.

In the past real silk was used as the mesh but advances in synthetic materials have increased reliability and reduced cost. The old name stuck around and we still call it silk-screening.

The positive films are laid directly on top of the mesh. Ultraviolet light is shone onto the assembly. Where there is an image on the positive film, no light gets through to the emulsion on the screening assembly beneath, leaving it unexposed. Where the film is clear, the light passes through and hits the emulsion, causing it to harden. When the development process is complete, the unexposed, soft areas of emulsion are washed away, leaving only the porous fabric mesh.

Idiosyncrasies of screen printing

The idiosyncrasies of screen printing and the surface of the CD that can affect your designs include:

  • The standard line screen for images on disc is 100lpi resulting in a possible loss of image detail (compared with 150 lpi booklets).
  • It is almost impossible to match the colors on your booklet with the CD silk-screen. Use complimentary colors and designs.
  • Spot color rather than CMYK printing will give you crisper results. Registering a CMYK CD label is more challenging because it is round.
  • The thick applications of ink required for screen printing can make fine lines and detail disappear (including very small type and serifs under 6 points).
  • Because the disc surface is metallic silver, not paper white, you may need to add an additional white flood under the color to allow more accurate tone and detail.
  • Designs with gradual fades from one color to another may reproduce poorly due to dot gain and tonal jump that make colors darker and produce pronounced dots in the image. Anything below 15% of a color tone usually disappears and anything 85% or greater just closes up and becomes 100% tone.
  • Because the disc’s innards switch from aluminum, to a mirror band, to clear plastic, ink color appears differently on the clear inner hub, the mirror band, and the main silver surface of the disc. To eliminate this problem, a white flood is added which equalizes the surface beneath the silk screened inks.

Top quality services

MJK Disc wants to help you in understanding and managing the reproduction, printing and packaging of your CD or DVD releases. We are dedicated to providing you state of the art solutions and top quality services.

RGB vs CMYK


Color modes

A common error when delivering images by clients is the delivery of images in RGB-mode.

RGB is one of the two most widely used color modes and is used mainly for display on monitors.

CMYK however is the only right color mode for print.

RGB vs CMYK

RGB

Red, Green, and Blue are "additive colors". If we combine red, green and blue light you will get white light. This is the principal behind the T.V. set in your living room and the monitor you are staring at now.

Additive color, or RGB mode, is optimized for display on computer monitors and peripherals, most notably scanning devices.

CMYK

Cyan, Magenta and Yellow are "subtractive colors". If we print cyan, magenta and yellow inks on white paper, they absorb the light shining on the page. Since our eyes receive no reflected light from the paper, we perceive black… in a perfect world!

The printing world operates in subtractive color, or CMYK mode.

In practice, printing subtractive inks may contain impurities that prevent them from absorbing light perfectly. They do a pretty good job with light colors, but when we add them all together, they produce a murky brown rather than black. In order to get decent dark colors, black ink is added in increasing proportions, as the color gets darker and darker. This is the "K" component in CMYK printing. "K" is used to indicate black instead of a "B" to avoid possible confusion over Blue ink.

Always deliver your digital images in CMYK-mode!

One of the most common errors made by inexperienced graphic designers is submitting RGB files. As a result we must ask if they would like us to convert to CMYK before we send the files for film output. Most of the time, the color change that will occur is slight. However, every once in a while, the color range after conversion is compressed during the transition to CMYK mode resulting in a complete change in color tones. Be warned that there is absolutely no way to get that deep RGB blue using CMYK, no matter how much we want to.

CMYK color shifts

Designing full color (CMYK) artwork for CD-ROM replication projects can be tricky. Since a disc is made of plastic it has different printing and ink absorption properties than paper. It is near impossible to exactly match CMYK colors between your inserts and labels.

Since CMYK colors on the CD label can shift dramatically MJK Disc Productions cannot be held responsible for color deviations due to the limitations of the silk-screen process. Unfortunately, even film-based proofs for the label artwork are not guaranteed.

For technical reasons colors can shift from the start of your run to the end, so no color match warranty is ever expressed, written or implied by MJK Disc Productions with regards to CMYK CD label printing color matching.

Tips to avoid disapointments

  • The easiest way to ensure color accuracy is to use PMS spot colors
  • Keep your design simple.
  • Unfortunately, there are no totally accurate means for viewing what the actual printed surface of a CMYK label will look like before you begin production. Even seasoned professionals cannot anticipate many of the undesirable effects that may occur from time to time while trying to color match. CMYK Proofs are to be used only as guidelines.

CMYK Workflow

When designing for CMYK printing there are a few application specific tips to follow:

Photoshop
Your scanner almost certainly generates RGB information. Don’t worry, that’s how it’s supposed to work. In fact, you should leave your color files in RGB mode until you need to finalize your project, or until you need to know CMYK ink values so you can match colors in another program. While you are working you can check how your files are going to look by turning on the "CMYK preview" mode.

Don’t make repeated changes between RGB and CMYK mode, using the mode menu. Every time you switch, a little clarity is lost. One switch is no problem; 20 switches makes a difference.

So why not simply switch to CMYK mode as soon as possible?

  • RGB files are 25% smaller and therefore 25% faster to work with and easier to store.
  • The SWOP CMYK gamut is pretty small. If you ever want to reproduce those files for a different medium (such as the web), you’ll have thrown away some potentially useful information.

Illustrator
Stick to CMYK and Grayscale color models when working on the paper parts of your project (booklets, traycards, etc.). If you use Pantone Coated colors on anything paper, make sure that you are willing to pay all the associated up charges. Stay away from RGB. Refer to www.adobe.com and the program’s help section for details.

Pagemaker
Menu choice WINDOW contains the "Show Colors" palette. This program functions much the same way as Illustrator and Quark in that you can add custom swatches for use in your document. Refer to Adobe’s web site and the program’s help section for details.

QuarkXpress
Familiarize yourself with the "Edit | Colors" dialog box. Use only CMYK mode and ensure that the spot color checkbox is off. Make sure that you are in control of which colors should separate into CMYK by installing a post script printer and using the output tab in the Print dialog window. Be aware that Quark’s ability to represent color accurately is, shall we say, less than ideal. (use a swatch book!)

Visit www.quark.com for additional help.


Color mode warning

A CMYK color image from a printer doesn’t match that on your RGB monitor!

Offset printing


Print missions

Our goal is to provide our clients with reliability, top quality prints, quick delivery, and massive production capabilities, at the the best possible price.

Offset printing

History

Offset printing is a technology that has been around for over 100 years now.
The term “Offset” gets its name from the fact that the plate cylinder which holds the art information does not come in contact with the paper.

Procedure

Step 1: Making negatives:
The first step in the offset process is to create a negative from the original art. From this negative, a printing plate will be made.

Figure 1 below represents a digital file; Figure 2 is created inside the image setter.

Step 2: Printing Plates:
The negative is then placed in contact with a metal printing plate (fig. 3 below), which is coated with a photosensitive, ink-receptive emulsion. It is exposed to light and the plate is developed, leaving the emulsion (illustrated by the magenta book image) only where it was exposed.

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Step 3: Wetting:
As in stone lithography, offset lithography uses the water-versus-oil principle to make a print. The plate is first moistened with water (See main illustration at the top of this section). This keeps the non-image areas damp, and therefore more resistant to the oil-based inks used in this process. The plate is now ready to be inked.

Step 4: Inking / Offsetting:
After the printing plate is developed, it is attached to a cylinder on the printing press. As it turns, the plate offsets this inked image to a rubber blanket, creating a reverse image. The blanket then offsets this image to the paper, reversing it again and making a "right" reading, final print.

Step 5: Multiple Passes To Achieve Full Color:
Multiple colors are accomplished by changing the color of the ink in each station as it passes through the press. Modern presses not only have 4 color stations but also add a varnish coat to help eliminate finger prints on the paper.

offset drukken op CD's en DVD's

Step 3: Wetting:
As in stone lithography, offset lithography uses the water-versus-oil principle to make a print. The plate is first moistened with water (See main illustration at the top of this section). This keeps the non-image areas damp, and therefore more resistant to the oil-based inks used in this process. The plate is now ready to be inked.

Step 4: Inking / Offsetting:
After the printing plate is developed, it is attached to a cylinder on the printing press. As it turns, the plate offsets this inked image to a rubber blanket, creating a reverse image. The blanket then offsets this image to the paper, reversing it again and making a "right" reading, final print.

Step 5: Multiple Passes To Achieve Full Color:
Multiple colors are accomplished by changing the color of the ink in each station as it passes through the press. Modern presses not only have 4 color stations but also add a varnish coat to help eliminate finger prints on the paper.

offset drukken op CD's en DVD's


Experienced in print and design

We can offer you an extremely wide capability for offset printing as well as graphic design.